Dr. Frank Glover, one of the world’s leading experts on the global Ebola crisis, spoke with Brenau's Jay Andrews, UNG's Dr. Al Panu and David Miller, an associate professor and lead faculty for the Brenau MBA program in health care management, in an interview about the disease on 89.1 WBCX.
Dr. Frank Glover, one of the world’s leading experts on the global Ebola crisis, visited the 89.1 WBCX studio to speak about the disease and it's outbreak in West Africa.

Global Health Expert Glover: Ebola Crisis Could Have Been Contained Earlier

Dec. 3, 2014
David Morrison

One of the world’s leading experts on the global Ebola crisis warns that the United States and other countries should take care to maintain health care infrastructures as a first line of defense against uncontrollable outbreaks of deadly disease.

Dr. Frank E. Glover, urologist and public health doctor who has worked extensively in Africa during the last three decades, made his comments during an extensive interview on 89.1 WBCX-FM, the Brenau University radio station. The program will be broadcast Friday, Dec. 5, at 12:05 p.m. and also on Sunday, Dec. 7 at 11 a.m. as a lead-in to BBC World News, which airs daily on WBCX. The program also is available on our WBCX interviews page.

Glover said that countries like Liberia and other West African nations stand as cautionary tales: when Ebola this year began ravaging urban areas in these countries, hospitals, clinics and other facilities had fallen into such poor states and the availability of health care professionals in those areas had diminished to the point that the system could not keep up.

“Had they (Liberia) had a health system in place we would not have had to spend ten percent of what we’ve spent and the Ebola outbreak would be over,” Glover said. “Because they didn’t have a healthcare system in place, it’s costing a lot more, it’s a lot less efficient and the death toll will undoubtedly reach into the tens of thousands.”

Glover, a Savannah native and a University of Georgia honors graduate, earned his medical degree as well as a second doctorate in public health, specializing in international health, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In addition to his successful medical practice serving Albany and other Southwest Georgia cities, he is a medical missionary, partnering with SIM, a Christian missions organization with works in over 60 countries. He also serves as president of SHIELD in Africa, a U.S.-based organization working in Liberia.

Brenau Director of Broadcasting and Digital Communications Jay Andrews, David Miller, associate professor and lead faculty for the Brenau MBA program in health care management, and Dr. Al Panu, senior vice president for university affairs at the University of North Georgia, conducted the WBCX interview.

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